Can I Sue My Employer?

Generally speaking, workers cannot sue their employers if they are injured on the job. This is because injured workers are entitled to workers' compensation benefits, which provide no-fault lost wage and medical benefits. The workers' compensation system acts as a trade-off between employers and employees: workers receive automatic compensation for almost any injury, and employers gain protection from personal injury lawsuits.

Under certain circumstances, however, workers can still file a lawsuit after suffering an injury at work. If, for example, your employer's actions were particularly egregious or showed a willful intent to harm, you may file a personal injury lawsuit on those grounds. You may also file a lawsuit if your employer failed to purchase workers' compensation insurance.

Third-Party Claims

While most workers are barred from suing their employer, they are not barred from suing other companies associated with the workplace. If you were injured at work due to the negligence of a supplier, contractor, subcontractor, equipment manufacturer or any other party that does not employ you, you have a right to seek compensation.

This type of lawsuit is known as a third-party claim. Third-party claims can be pursued in conjunction with workers' compensation, ensuring that you receive the full compensation to which you are entitled.

Our law firm is prepared to handle a wide variety of third-party claims, including driving accidents, claims against product manufacturers and claims against subcontractors. These actions allow victims to claim compensation for more losses than those covered under workers' compensation: in addition to medical bills and lost wages, victims can also receive payment for factors such as emotional distress, pain and suffering, and loss of enjoyment of life.

Contact A Third-Party Injury Claim Lawyer

If a third party has contributed to an injury you suffered while on the job, the attorneys at Rubin, Glickman, Steinberg and Gifford can help you hold that company responsible. To schedule a free consultation with our Montgomery County law firm, contact us online or call 215-822-7575.